Tribolum.com Making Light of Things

Family at Work

It wasn’t without trepidation as I looked again at the email asking if I could host a small group of techies at Google. It was a good mutually beneficial arrangement: I’d be able to reach and preach to these tech professionals on pragmatic tips to keep themselves safe from the latest (and evergreen) online scams; and they’d get to have their meeting at our pretty nifty office.

The trepidation came from the fact that the only date that seemed to fit everyone elses’ schedule was on Faith’s birthday. A quick passing consult seemed to me like she was ok with me having to work an event on her birthday, but my spider-sense couldn’t help tingling.

On the day of the event itself, I felt terrible about spending the evening of my wife’s birthday at work. It’s not that she made a big deal about it or anything - it just felt like a misstep on my part.

As I rushed about to ensure that the logistics were all in order, I told the facilities folks who were helping me out that it was my wife’s birthday and how it nagged me a little that I had an event to take care of.

It didn’t take more than 20 seconds for them to pull together a small bunch of beautiful purple roses. They were meant for an earlier welfare initiative of theirs but they were so quick to come to my rescue. I gratefully accepted this lifeline.

When the event was over and I got home late in the night, I brought the bunch of roses into the room. Lit only by the light of her mobile phone, I saw Faith smile as she saw the flowers in my hand.

There was a nanosecond of a dilemma, but soon as she pulled the earphones out I told her how the Google gang pulled this together. There was an initial puzzled look on her face. I can only imagine the conflict of emotions, but my wife accepted my apology, and then said that it was nice that the fabled hospitality of the Google facilities team extended even to her on her birthday.

I’m thankful to have married a wife who forgives my mistakes, and on this occasion, very grateful to the team at work for caring far above and beyond the demands of their job.

This is what it feels like to be part of the Google family. Really, really awesome.

You Don't Demand Heart

I am no longer a public servant and it has been more than two years since I left the service, but I have always considered building the nation a duty I carry whether or not I am on payroll. I hope you’ll pardon me when I lapse between identifying myself as part of the service, and also part of the people whom they serve.

When I read that several Members of Parliament lamented that the Public Service has “lost its heart” and called for the service to show greater empathy when dealing with the needy, I felt the sting of those words like a slap across the face.

Not many people know what it is actually like to be on the frontlines of the public service. I am proud of the tradition we have: that we do not tolerate corruption and work hard to maintain the highest standards of integrity. We are by no measure infallible, but every breach is met with a burning fury and steely determination not to let mistakes repeat themselves.

We fall short of perfection, but it is a standard to which we believe the Singapore people deserve. It has also become the standard the Singapore people demand.

Every year the Auditor-General combs through how Ministries and Statutory Boards conduct their business and publishes a list of what it believes are infringements. This is a healthy process that keeps our public agencies accountable to the people, and provides a level of transparency rarely seen in governments around the world. Public servants put their feet to the fire, and are called to answer these lapses in processes. The alternative media has made it an annual event to jump into the fray to stoke the flames.

We’re fine with that. We’ve worked on making our processes more iron-clad. Nowhere in Singapore will you find it harder to host a lunch for stakeholders or even buy a pencil. Any public servant will tell you that we’ve had to spend our own money at work because the by-the-book processes would have taken too long and cost too much pain.

I cannot even imagine how much these stringent measures cost the nation; the most expensive of which are the many public servants who have left the service because it was getting too difficult to serve.

You cannot demand pinpoint precision from the public service and not expect the creation of automatons. Mr Louis Ng brings out the example of how the computer-generated letter was heartless - and he is correct - but would he support a judgement call made by a junior officer if and when it is scrutinised by the armchair critics? Would our MPs be there for the public servant who exercised their knowledge to say, buy good quality bicycles at a reasonable price, when there is public outcry from the non-cycling community about those decisions?

I do not disagree that our public service needs more heart and more empathy, but I’m calling it out that we all do. It’s easy to stand in a hall and berate the service, and constantly demand excellence like it were a naturally-occuring state of things, but we need a different approach.

We need to empower the public service, and it sometimes means not sweating the small stuff. If we want officers to show heart and empathy it means giving them the power to make judgement calls, and not kill every mistake, especially those that have no ill-intent. We need to stand up for them and defend them in public and in private, and acknowledge that the quality of public services we enjoy in Singapore is commendable.

The relationship between the public service and the people needs to change from a master-slave relationship for us to progress beyond precision in process. For any relationship to flourish, finger-pointing needs to stop.

Keeping Gambling Out of Our Homes

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The building of two integrated resorts in Singapore was a major turning point in our nation’s history. It was the decision made after a long and hard debate that divided many in Parliament, and even drew agonised tears from some members when it was announced that we would go ahead with it. It was a direction that was very reluctantly chosen, and under great pressure given the economic situation at that time.

Yesterday, the Government exempted two organisations from the online gambling ban. There was no significant debate, no tears, and from my layman’s point of view, little reluctance.

One of the questions I get quite often when I run workshops for educators on keeping students safe online is: “What is the greatest threat to our kids?”. There isn’t one single “threat”, I’d explain, but the massive shift from desktop to mobiles has changed the game entirely.

Where once parents would place the family desktop in the living room so that all surfing could be supervised, children now grab mobile devices and take off to their own private corners. It has made supervision that much harder.

That is what happened today with gambling. Yes there are Singapore Pools’ stalls that dot every neighbourhood street corner, but the effort of actually walking there and queuing up was a natural barrier for the less habitual gambler. Now that these barriers are taken away, these stalls have made their way into our homes and our bedrooms.

You won’t find Singaporeans proud of our perpetually long lines for Toto tickets. In fact, many of us sigh under our breaths when our loved ones make the trip to donate the little they have towards this senseless pastime. It is a real battle in many households. So real that the government set up the National Council for Problem Gambling. I’m disappointed to not have heard from the council.

I wrote some years back about the search for Singapore’s semangat. Some principles we hold make us who we are in the world. A staunch stand against vice has historically been Singapore’s calling card. We’ve always acknowledged our frailties and worked hard to keep ourselves free from them. These exemptions, when passed with little or weak justifications, make a mockery of our principles and damage our identity.

So far, the only reasons for the online gambling exemptions that I’ve managed to glean from the news are

  1. it is hard to completely eradicate remote gambling
  2. Banning it drives users underground, making us a target for crime syndicates

We need to weigh those reasons against the social cost. Right now we are emotionally drawn to the social cost because it is borne by families, perhaps our own or belonging to people we know and love. We need more information on how much damage these crime syndicates do to us. 120 people arrested in the past year and a half doesn’t quite tip the scales.

This is also posted on Medium.

Count on Me, Singapore

National Day Rally 2016

We all held our collective breaths when we heard that PM Lee had fainted delivering the National Day Rally speech. There was this odd mix of silence as the future suddenly became so much more uncertain, amidst the cacophony of social media gone crazy as everyone scoured every avenue to find out what happened, and whether he was ok.

We never got to see whether PM Lee fainted, but the video of the moments just before circulated minutes after we received news. The image of PM Lee holding tight to the rostrum - shaking - and then leaning to one side drove Faith and me to tears. How heavy the burden this one man bore.

If Singapore were a family, and former PM Lee Kuan Yew our founding father, PM Lee finds his place as our eldest brother. He was always known to be a little stiff, but in recent years he revealed a much more human side through his photography on Instagram, always signed off “Photo by me”.

That his body fell short of the mammoth task of delivering the National Day Rally speech — essentially the summary of the past year and the vision for the country’s future, with segments in 3 languages no less — felt like an emotional blow we really were’t ready for. We had only just lost Lee Kuan Yew. I wasn’t sure we built up the emotional reserves for another.

What happened last night was a necessary reminder for us to remember our individual mortality. Nation-building is a responsibility of every citizen. The song “Count on me, Singapore” takes on new meaning. You and I are Singapore, and we need to be committed to build each other up even if we come from different races, different religions, or hold different political views. We build each other up that we may prosper as a nation to leave a legacy for future generations.

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We managed to sneak in a quiet dinner, before coming home to what was now THREE sick kids (up from one in the morning).

Happy anniversary, sweetest wife. There’s no one I’d rather have on the team. For better, for worse, till death.